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  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    7
    Hi,
    Meg here again.... I first wrote back in September when I had my first attack after driving for over 30 years.
    Well today I experienced a second attack while driving on the GSParkway again.

    When I had my first (very bad) attack in September, I was alone and my husband had to come get me. Today I was with my husband. We decided to do some shopping at a mall that is about 305 minutes south of us. He drove there and said I would drive back home. Once on the parkway, we were about 15 minutes from our exit and out of nowhere I started feeling lightheaded (dizzy)...and began hyperventilating although not as bad as the first attack.... :huh: I told my husband to talk to me ...that it was happening again...he did but those awful, awful feelings were not going away even with his reassuring words. I HAD to pull over on the shoulder of the parkway so I could slide into the passenger seat.
    I started crying and trembling...angry for feeling so paralyzed and not understanding what brought on another attack. I really thought the first attack was the last. Since the first one, I've had no problems with local driving and, in fact, drove on the parkway maybe once or twice if for only a few exits. I was not even thinking of the first attack I had in September....my husband and I were just talking (nothing stressful) when out of nowhere the dizziness started ....etc., etc.
    I suppose the only way I will find out what is bringing on these attacks is to seek professional help. For all who have experienced these attacks while driving, please tell me there is hope where I will be able to drive on a parkway/highway again without fear of an attack springing up out of nowhere.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    England
    Posts
    385
    HI MEG,
    I KNOW EXACLY HOW YOU FEEL. THE SAME HAPPENS TO ME.
    I KNOW I CAN OVER COME IT AS I HAVE WITH OTHER THINGS BUT WHEN YOU'RE IN CHARGE OF A HUGE MACHINE AND HAVE AN ATTACK, IT MAKES IT ALL THE MORE SCAREY.
    AGAINST MY BETTER JUDGEMENT, I AVOID DRIVING ON THE BIG ROADS AND I KNOW IT'S NOT THE ROADS THAT ARE THE CAUSE, IT'S ME.
    GETTING PROFFESIONAL HELP IS THE BEST IDEA.
    I PULL OVER TOO AND LET MY ATTACKS PASS, WHICH I AM ABLE TO DO, BUT ON A MASSIVE BUSY MOTOR-WAY, IT'S NOT SO EASY, SO I DON'T DRIVE ON THEM.

    DRIVING ROUND NORMAL ROADS, BUSY OR NOT, IS NOT A PROBLEM FOR ME ANYMORE, BUT IT WAS. I DIDN'T WANT TO STOP DRIVING AND FOUGHT IT WHEN 'IT' WAS TAKING OVER ME ALL THE TIME.
    WE GET THESE THOUGHTS IN OUR HEADS AND IT'S HARD TO LET GO.

    KEEP DRIVING. DON'T LET IT GET THE BETTER OF YOU.
    LET US KNOW HOW YOU GET ON?

    ANGIE

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    413
    <span style='color:red'>Hi, Meg.</span>

    <span style='color:blue'>I read your posts before and, having a driving phobia about motorways here in the UK as well, I really felt for you. However since I no longer have a car and have eyesight problems which would make it impossible for me to risk driving anyway, the "problem" no longer applies to me.

    And, as the advice given you already by Libby, Dewey, Dino, Petal and Angie is so good and seems to cover all the bases, I didn't bother posting back to you before.

    All I want to add is this: with your husband's high speed driving, you should remind him that it doesn't really matter how good a driver he is (and I do know just how well trained the police drivers are!). The point is that the very best driver in the world can still get hit by some other idiot driver and then the biggest factor of all in whether anyone gets out and walks away afterwards is how fast they were all going at the time of the accident. Your husband will obviously already know that from his own doubtless horrendous experiences in the job. You could remind him though?

    With your own attempts to beat the panic, Angie's most recent advice is excellent. Concentrate as much as you possibly can on the minor roads. But you must also practise the motorways too, but for just tiny distances, one exit to the next and then back home again, every day if you possibly can. Don't wait for a reason to drive on them, go at them hammer and tongs as often as you can.

    Be kind to yourself and don't try to do it as a punishment to your "stupid, irrational self", just be gently and firmly persistent and try to ever-so-gradually push the boundaries. After a few days of one exit to the next and back again, try two, etc, etc. Every time you get a set back, just accept it as part of the two-steps-forward-one-backwards characteristic of this whole thing.

    And be warned: if you have to stop your practising for a while, for whatever reason, you will have to start again (not from scratch) to rebuild your sense of self-confidence. Through no fault of your own (or your husband's!) your brain has tied its anxiety to the focus of "Driving" and has conditioned itself to it now as a matter of habit. You can, with gentle persistence and determination and lots and lots of patience, recondition your brain back into a more comfortable reaction to the stimulus of driving. It IS beatable!

    All the best to you, and please let us all know how you're doing, OK?

    Love</span>


    <span style='color:red'>Gord</span>
    <span style='color:green'>xxxxx</span>
    [b][color=#008000]JADE[/color] -- [color=#0000FF]The Mental Health Website & Chat Room for Under-16s[/color][/b]


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  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    313
    Hello again Meg.

    Can i suggest NOT listening to AC/DC's Highway To Hell wile driving then?



    But seriously... what Gord says is true.

    You have developed Anticipatory Panic. While you are driving and every thing is fine, in the back of your mind, just under the surface, you are focussing on your boddily functions and as time goes by this will get worse if you dont nip it in the butt.


    I myself was the same, and it has gotten so that if i drive five minutes from my house i can go from calm to Kubrick in 30 seconds flat...

    Mind over matter and all that. A good therapist might be able to help. I doubt it could be the bump on the head itself, but you might have initially used that as an excuse (subconciously), but your mind is conditioning you to have these responses.

    You been driving over 30 years... never once have you arrived at your destination dead. Why would you now?

    As long as your ticker and your internals are working fine, you dont have any need to worry.



    Sheesh... look what you made me do again.

    I am a man of few words you know!!!



    :lol:

    Keep it real Sis

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  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    2

    Re: Back again....SECOND ATTACK WHILE DRIVING!

    I too have had periodic bouts of panic while driving. If you drink or eat things with aspertame or splenda in them, I highly suggest stopping. I did two weeks ago and feel much better, no attacks since then. There is something called exito-toxins in these chemicals they sell as sweeteners. Google it, you will be surprised and hopefully...cured. I was!

 

 

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